Visual Basic C#

This tool is to analyze your Visual Basic 6.0 projects to determine what issues you will need to address to be able to upgrade. It also provides information about where to get help understanding. It would be better to think of Visual Basic.NET as a new language inspired by the classic Visual Basic rather than as a continuation of Visual Basic 6.0, with the added difficulty for migrating programmers that VB.NET interfaces with the.NET Framework whereas VB6 was based on the Component Object Model (COM).

The C# support in Visual Studio Code is optimized for cross-platform .NET Core development (see working with .NET Core and VS Code for another relevant article). Our focus with VS Code is to be a great editor for cross-platform C# development.

VS Code supports debugging of C# applications running on either .NET Core or Mono.

For detailed instructions on:

  • .NET Core debugging - see the Microsoft C# extension's GitHub page.
  • Mono debugging - see the Mono Debug extension's README.
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Note:VS Code has limited support for debugging applications running on the Desktop .NET Framework.

Due to this focus, many standard C# project types are not recognized by VS Code. An example of a non-supported project type is an ASP.NET MVC Application (though ASP.NET Core is supported). In these cases, if you want to have a lightweight tool to edit a file - VS Code has you covered. If you want the best possible experience for those projects and development on Windows in general, we recommend you use Visual Studio Community.

Installing C# support

C# language support is an optional install from the Marketplace. You can install it from within VS Code by searching for 'C#' in the Extensions view (⇧⌘X (Windows, Linux Ctrl+Shift+X)) or if you already have a project with C# files, VS Code will prompt you to install the extension as soon as you open a C# file.

Roslyn and OmniSharp

Visual Studio Code uses the power of Roslyn and OmniSharp to offer an enhanced C# experience. We offer support for:

  • .NET Core projects
  • MSBuild projects
  • C# scripts (CSX)

On startup the best matching projects are loaded automatically but you can also choose your projects manually. The status bar will show what projects have been loaded and also allows you to select a different set of projects. To do so, click on the status bar projects item and select Change projects…. In the image below a single project has been picked up:

The available options include:

  • Selecting a project.json file will open a .NET Core project and VS Code will load that project plus the referenced projects.
  • Selecting a *.sln file opens a MSBuild-project. It will load the referenced *.csproj projects and sibling or descendant project.json files but no other project files that are referenced from the solution file.
  • Selecting a folder will make VS Code scan for *.sln, project.json and *.csx files (C# scripts) and VS Code will attempt to load them all.

Once the project is loaded the enhanced experiences light up..

Editing Evolved

There is a lot to discover with C# and the editor, such as format on type, IntelliSense, the rename-refactoring, etc.

For a full description of our editing features, go to the Basic Editing and Code Navigation documentation.

Here are a few highlights..

IntelliSense

IntelliSense just works: hit ⌃Space (Windows, Linux Ctrl+Space) at any time to get context specific suggestions.

Snippets for C#

We have several built-in snippets included in VS Code that will come up as you type or you can press ⌃Space (Windows, Linux Ctrl+Space) (Trigger Suggest) and we will give you a context specific list of suggestions.

Tip: You can add in your own User Defined Snippets for C#. Take a look at User Defined Snippets to find out how.

Search for Symbols

There are also features outside the editor. One is the ability to search for symbols from wherever you are. Hit ⌘T (Windows, Linux Ctrl+T), start typing, and see a list of matching C# symbols. Select one and you'll be taken straight to its code location.

CodeLens

Another cool feature is the ability to see the number of references to a method directly above the method. Click on the reference info to see the references in the Peek view. This reference information updates as you type.

Note: Methods defined in object, such as equals and hashCode do not get reference information due to performance reasons.

Tip: You can turn off references information displayed in CodeLens with the editor.codeLenssetting.

Find References/Peek Definition

You can click on the references of an object to find the locations of its use in place without losing context. This same experience works in reverse where you can Peek the definition of an object and see it inline without leaving your location.

Quick Fixes / Suggestions

There are some basic quick fixes supported in VS Code. You will see a lightbulb and clicking on it, or pressing ⌘. (Windows, Linux Ctrl+.) provides you with a simple list of fixes/suggestions.

Next steps

Read on to find out about:

  • .NET Core Development - get up and running with cross-platform .NET
  • Basic Editing - Learn about the powerful VS Code editor.
  • Tasks - Use tasks to build your project and more.
  • Debugging - Find out how to use the debugger with your project.
  • Unity development - Learn about using VS Code with your Unity projects.

Common questions

My Project won't load

Visual Basic C# 2010 Download

VS Code only supports a limited set of project types (primarily .NET Core). For full .NET project support, we suggest you use Visual Studio Community.

Visual Basic C# Download

IntelliSense is not working

This is typically as a result of the current project type not being supported. You can see an indication in the OmniSharp flame in the bottom left hand side of the status bar.

How do I build/run my project?

VS Code supports tasks for build and natively understand the output of MSBuild, CSC, XBuild. Find out more in the Tasks documentation.

I'm missing required assets to build and debug C# in VS Code. My debugger says 'No Configuration'

Visual Basic C# Games

The Visual Studio Code C# extension can generate the assets you need to build and debug. If you missed the prompt when you first opened a new C# project, you can still perform this operation through the Command Palette (View > Command Palette) by typing '.NET', and running .NET: Generate Assets for Build and Debug. This command will generate the necessary launch.json and tasks.json configuration files (under the .vscode folder).

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This section of the documentation helps you get started with Visual Basic application development.

Get started with Visual Basic and .NET Core

Visual Basic C#

Additional information

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  • What's new for Visual BasicLists new features in each of the versions of Visual Basic .NET.

  • Additional Resources for Visual Basic ProgrammersProvides a list of Web sites and newsgroups that can help you find answers to common problems.

See also

  • Get Visual BasicProvides download links for Visual Studio versions that come with Visual Basic support, including free versions.

  • Object-Oriented ProgrammingProvides links to pages that introduce object-oriented programming and describe how to create your own objects and how to use objects to simplify your coding. Ob_get_contents.

  • SamplesProvides links to sample code in Visual Basic.

  • WalkthroughsProvides a list of Help pages that demonstrate aspects of the Visual Basic language.

  • Feedback options for Visual StudioCovers how to receive support and give feedback.

  • Visual StudioProvides links into the Visual Studio documentation.

  • C#Provides links into the documentation on application development with Visual C#.

  • Visual C++Provides links into the Visual C++ documentation.

  • Office and SharePoint DevelopmentProvides information about using Microsoft Office and Visual Studio as part of a business application.