Rename All Files At Once

File-renaming is an important function, as it helps us allocate a more meaningful name to the target file(s).

When you use a shell loop, the mv forks once per file. Perl's rename command does not. (Perl's rename command has some restrictions, but in this specific case those restrictions don't apply.) As for the rename command shown earlier, yes that works, but then you have all that confusion between two different kinds of rename and so on. This starts a loop with f being assigned to the name of each docx file in turn. Mv -i - '$f' 'some/other/dir/$ ((count=count+1)).docx' This renames/moves the files. $ ((count=count+1)) tells the shell to increment the count each time. Under bash, $ ((count=count+1)) can be simplified to. Feb 20, 2019 However, if the 100 files are all named random characters and you want them to be really similar like housepics, you can use the Windows 10 renaming function to rename the first to housepics (1), the second to housepics (2), the third to housepics (3), and so on.

Open

In Windows, Windows Explorer/ File Explorer does not provide any advanced mechanism to rename multiple files. However, there are a couple of native methods that help users rename files, namely by using the Command Prompt and Windows PowerShell. One downside of these methods is that the user needs to be well versed with the commands of these programs. Taking a cursory view, CMD, aka Command Prompt uses batch scripts, whereas PowerShell uses shell scripts to perform the required task. This tutorial demonstrates how to rename multiple files to add Suffix and Prefix with the help of Command Prompt’s batch scripts as well as with an automated solution. The final choice lies with you!

If you prefer to let the computer take control and do it all with minimum input as well as any major efforts on your part, Easy File Renamer is what you need. Simply choose from 10 different renaming templates this software provides to you (including prefix and suffix) and set the renaming process into motion. Also, you can even use more than one renaming rules at a single instance.

Easy File Renamer is a digitally protected software

How to Add Suffix

  • Open folder containing files. Next, right click on the first file and select Rename. Give any desired name to the file and press Tab key, it will rename the first file and take you to the second file to rename. Now you have to just enter the file name and keep pressing Tab key to move to the next file until all the files are renamed.
  • Renaming Multiple Files at Once Start by navigating to the folder where you want to rename multiple files. If within this folder, you are certain that you want to rename all files, either use the.
Rename

The suffix is basically a word that is added at end of an existing word to result in a more meaningful word. Windows Explorer/ File Explorer do provide the user with quite limited options with regards to adding suffixes to a filename. Therefore we turn towards the best possible option. We can either straightaway paste the code in Command Prompt (admin mode) and execute it or paste this code in a Notepad file and save it as filename.bat. Now simply double-clicking the file will execute the code and hence, do the needful by adding a suffix to multiple files.

Note: Don’t forget to enter in the exact username in place of ABCDEF in the opening line of this code.

cd “C:UsersABCDEFMyFolder”

setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion

set num=0

for %%x in (*.*) do (

set fnam=%%~nx

set ext=%%~xx

ren “%%x” “!fnam! + Suffix!ext!”

set /a num+=1

Rename All Files In A Folder At Once

)

pause

How to Add Prefix

The prefix is the polar opposite of suffix and is added before a filename. The whole exercise is aimed at adding a name to the existing filename so that the whole filename becomes more meaningful and easy to make sense of. Again, there are big limitations with regards to adding a prefix via Windows Explorer/ File Explorer, so we will have to again revert to using the exact same method as described for the Suffix.

Note: Replace the ABCDEF in the opening line of this code by typing in your username.

cd “C:UsersABCDEFMyFolder”

How To Rename All Files In A Folder At Once Windows 10

setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion

set num=0

for %%x in (*.*) do (

set fnam=%%~nx

set ext=%%~xx

ren “%%x” “Prefix + !fnam!!ext!”

set /a num+=1

Open Rename File

)

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Diving into the nitty-gritty of both of the scripts, the code uses CD command in order to change the currently active directory. In a nutshell, CD means change directory, and thereby any command following this line is only applicable to the currently active folder. The second line sets the local to EnableDelayedExpansion, which helps in delaying the variable expansion to execution time instead of the parsing time. In batch scripting terminology, variable expansion refers to replacing the given variable with the corresponding value. For instance, here %%~nx is replaced with the name of the file X and %%~xx is replaced with the file extension of the file X. X is the file read in each iteration of the loop (here it performs the DO loop). !VARIABLE NAME! is used to read the values (filename and the file extension) assigned to the respective variable followed by the set keyword. Both scripts use (set) fnam and (set) ext lines as variables to receive respectively, the file name and the file extension from the filename that is currently being read. In each iteration the currently read filename and extension are assigned to the respective variable. And then each variable is used while renaming the file within the loop.