Microsoft Visual Studio Enterprise

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Welcome to Visual Studio 2019! In this version, it's easy to choose and install just the features you need. And because of its reduced minimum footprint, it installs quickly and with less system impact.

Welcome to a new way to install Visual Studio! In this version, we've made it easier for you to choose and install just the features you need. We've also reduced the minimum footprint of Visual Studio so that it installs more quickly and with less system impact than ever before.

Note

Nvidia shield plex youtube. Visual Studio Enterprise Subscription Build smarter apps fast across teams of any size on PC and Mac with professional developer tools and services. This annual subscription includes access to core Microsoft software, Azure credits and discounted pricing, collaboration services, technical training, professional support, and more. The Visual Studio Enterprise subscription is a custom offering that is roughly equivalent to the Visual Studio Enterprise Standard subscription, but with certain benefits removed (many of which are offered separately to partners as general MPN benefits rather than as part of the Visual Studio Enterprise subscriptions offered through MPN).

This topic applies to Visual Studio on Windows. For Visual Studio for Mac, see Install Visual Studio for Mac.

Want to know more about what else is new in this version? See our release notes.

Want to know more about what else is new in this version? See our release notes.

Ready to install? We'll walk you through it, step-by-step.

Step 1 - Make sure your computer is ready for Visual Studio

Before you begin installing Visual Studio:

  1. Check the system requirements. These requirements help you know whether your computer supports Visual Studio 2017.

  2. Apply the latest Windows updates. These updates ensure that your computer has both the latest security updates and the required system components for Visual Studio.

  3. Reboot. The reboot ensures that any pending installs or updates don't hinder the Visual Studio install.

  4. Free up space. Remove unneeded files and applications from your %SystemDrive% by, for example, running the Disk Cleanup app.

  1. Check the system requirements. These requirements help you know whether your computer supports Visual Studio 2019.

  2. Apply the latest Windows updates. These updates ensure that your computer has both the latest security updates and the required system components for Visual Studio.

  3. Reboot. The reboot ensures that any pending installs or updates don't hinder the Visual Studio install.

  4. Free up space. Remove unneeded files and applications from your %SystemDrive% by, for example, running the Disk Cleanup app.

For questions about running previous versions of Visual Studio side by side with Visual Studio 2017, see the Visual Studio compatibility details.

For questions about running previous versions of Visual Studio side by side with Visual Studio 2019, see the Visual Studio 2019 Platform Targeting and Compatibility page.

Step 2 - Download Visual Studio

Next, download the Visual Studio bootstrapper file.

To get a bootstrapper for Visual Studio 2017, see the Visual Studio previous versions download page for details on how to do so.

To do so, choose the following button, choose the edition of Visual Studio that you want, choose Save, and then choose Open folder.

Step 3 - Install the Visual Studio installer

Run the bootstrapper file to install the Visual Studio Installer. This new lightweight installer includes everything you need to both install and customize Visual Studio.

  1. From your Downloads folder, double-click the bootstrapper that matches or is similar to one of the following files:

    • vs_community.exe for Visual Studio Community
    • vs_professional.exe for Visual Studio Professional
    • vs_enterprise.exe for Visual Studio Enterprise

    If you receive a User Account Control notice, choose Yes.

  2. We'll ask you to acknowledge the Microsoft License Terms and the Microsoft Privacy Statement. Choose Continue.

Step 4 - Choose workloads

Visual

After the installer is installed, you can use it to customize your installation by selecting the feature sets—or workloads—that you want. Here's how.

  1. Find the workload you want in the Visual Studio Installer.

    For example, choose the '.NET desktop development' workload. It comes with the default core editor, which includes basic code editing support for over 20 languages, the ability to open and edit code from any folder without requiring a project, and integrated source code control.

  2. After you choose the workload(s) you want, choose Install.

    Next, status screens appear that show the progress of your Visual Studio installation.

  1. Find the workload you want in the Visual Studio Installer.

    For example, choose the 'ASP.NET and web development' workload. It comes with the default core editor, which includes basic code editing support for over 20 languages, the ability to open and edit code from any folder without requiring a project, and integrated source code control.

  2. After you choose the workload(s) you want, choose Install.

    Next, status screens appear that show the progress of your Visual Studio installation.

Tip

At any time after installation, you can install workloads or components that you didn't install initially. If you have Visual Studio open, go to Tools > Get Tools and Features.. which opens the Visual Studio Installer. Or, open Visual Studio Installer from the Start menu. From there, you can choose the workloads or components that you wish to install. Then, choose Modify.

Step 5 - Choose individual components (Optional)

If you don't want to use the Workloads feature to customize your Visual Studio installation, or you want to add more components than a workload installs, you can do so by installing or adding individual components from the Individual components tab. Choose what you want, and then follow the prompts.

Step 6 - Install language packs (Optional)

Microsoft Visual Studio Enterprise 2013

By default, the installer program tries to match the language of the operating system when it runs for the first time. To install Visual Studio in a language of your choosing, choose the Language packs tab from the Visual Studio Installer, and then follow the prompts.

Change the installer language from the command line

Another way that you can change the default language is by running the installer from the command line. For example, you can force the installer to run in English by using the following command: vs_installer.exe --locale en-US. The installer will remember this setting when it is run the next time. The installer supports the following language tokens: zh-cn, zh-tw, cs-cz, en-us, es-es, fr-fr, de-de, it-it, ja-jp, ko-kr, pl-pl, pt-br, ru-ru, and tr-tr.

Step 7 - Select the installation location (Optional)

New in 15.7: You can now reduce the installation footprint of Visual Studio on your system drive. You can choose to move the download cache, shared components, SDKs, and tools to different drives, and keep Visual Studio on the drive that runs it the fastest.

You can reduce the installation footprint of Visual Studio on your system drive. You can choose to move the download cache, shared components, SDKs, and tools to different drives, and keep Visual Studio on the drive that runs it the fastest.

Important

You can select a different drive only when you first install Visual Studio. If you've already installed it and want to change drives, you must uninstall Visual Studio and then reinstall it.

For more information, see the Select installation locations page.

Step 8 - Start developing

  1. After Visual Studio installation is complete, choose the Launch button to get started developing with Visual Studio.

  2. Choose File, and then choose New Project.

  3. Select a project type.

    For example, to build a C++ app, choose Installed, expand Visual C++, and then choose the C++ project type that you want to build.

    To build a C# app, choose Installed, expand Visual C#, and then choose the C# project type that you want to build.

  1. After Visual Studio installation is complete, choose the Launch button to get started developing with Visual Studio.

  2. On the start window, choose Create a new project.

  3. In the search box, enter the type of app you want to create to see a list of available templates. The list of templates depends on the workload(s) that you chose during installation. To see different templates, choose different workloads.

    You can also filter your search for a specific programming language by using the Language drop-down list. You can filter by using the Platform list and the Project type list, too.

  4. Visual Studio opens your new project, and you're ready to code!

Get support

Sometimes, things can go wrong. If your Visual Studio installation fails, see Troubleshoot Visual Studio installation and upgrade issues for step-by-step guidance.

We also offer an installation chat (English only) support option for installation-related issues.

Here are a few more support options:

  • Report product issues to us via the Report a Problem tool that appears both in the Visual Studio Installer and in the Visual Studio IDE.
  • Suggest a feature, track product issues, and find answers in the Visual Studio Developer Community.
  • Use your GitHub account to talk to us and other Visual Studio developers in the Visual Studio conversation in the Gitter community.

See also

This extension provides the same functionality that currently exists in Visual Studio 2015 for Visual Studio Installer projects. To use this extension, you can either open the Extensions and Updates dialog, select the online node, and search for 'Visual Studio Installer Projects Extension,' or you can download directly from this page.

Once you have finished installing the extension and restarted Visual Studio, you will be able to open existing Visual Studio Installer projects, or create new ones.

The documentation is available here: https://aka.ms/vdproj-docs

For modern deployment targeting Windows 10 you can also use the Windows Packaging Project to create APPX and/or MSIX packages.

Microsoft Visual Studio Enterprise 2019

NOTE: This extension is designed to work with Visual Studio 2017 and Visual Studio 2019. You can download a version of this extension compatible with Visual Studio 2015 here.

What's new in 1.0.0

  • Adding support for 64-bit registry capture
  • Minor bug fixes, including this issue: https://developercommunity2.visualstudio.com/t/setup-deployment-project-gets-project-di/1291304

What's new in 0.9.9

  • Improved diagnostics when working with .NET Core 3.1+ projects (https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/visualstudio/deployment/installer-projects-net-core)
  • Minor bug fix

What's new in 0.9.8

  • Fixing a bug that would cause a build failure for projects with localization set to neutral.

What's new in 0.9.7

  • Changing certain instances of the error 'Unable to update the dependencies of the project. The dependencies for the object 'Foo.dll' cannot be determined' to be a warning instead. This was done to unblock certain scenarios, like when you want to include a managed assembly that was run through an obfuscator.
  • (VS 2019 only) Adding support for launch conditions for .NET Core 3+ apps. A launch condition will get automatically added for installer projects that consume the output of a .NET Core 3+ project. The version, architecture and framework (Core/Desktop) of the necessary runtime will be automatically detected, unless you specify it by editing the .NET Core launch condition in the Launch Conditions editor.

What's new in 0.9.6

  • (VS 2019 only) Updating default .NET framework version used in prerequisites and launch conditions
  • Fixing a crashing bug

What's new in 0.9.5

  • Fixing various accessibility issues
  • Some improvements to the .NET Core publish profile support added in the previous version
  • Fixing bug with file extension when generating multiple cab files
  • Additional bug fixes

What's new in 0.9.4

  • Fixing accessibility issues in generated installers
  • Adding new support .NET Core 3 scenarios. The output of .NET Core 3 projects should be consumed using 'PublishItemsOutputGroup' instead of 'Primary Output'. There's also a new 'PublishProfilePath' field in the properties window when 'PublishItemsOutputGroup' is selected which allows for the creation of self contained .NET Core 3 installers. More details to come.

Microsoft Visual Studio Enterprise 2019

What's new in 0.9.3

  • Fixing a potential out of memory error when building

What's new in 0.9.2

  • 64bit custom action support requires Opt-in for each custom action

What's new in 0.9.1

  • Support custom actions targeting x64
  • Support SDK Style Projects (e.g. ASP.NET Core)

Visual Studio Enterprise Subscription

What's new in 0.9.0

  • Support for Visual Studio 2019 and Visual Studio 2017
  • Fix an OutOfMemory exception when including large files as part of the setup

What's new in 0.8.8

  • Fix an issue with RegCap.exe to capture COM registry information
  • Fix default IIS detection on Win10

What's new in 0.8.7:

  • License update.

What's new in 0.8.6:

  • Fixes an issue in the Setup Wizard.

What's new in 0.8.5:

  • Fixes an issue with the latest Visual Studio updates where the MSI creation failed with the error 'No such interface supported'.

What's new in 0.8.4:

This version solves the following issues:

  • Solves Lightweight Solution Load issues
  • Updated literals that were using bad encoding
  • Avoid crashes with specific project types

0.8.3 Changes:

We have addressed the following isuses in this update:

  • Property Dialog available on right clicking the project file.
  • Adding a helper tool to enable command line builds using Visual Studio 2017. You can run the executable located in Program Files (x86)Microsoft Visual Studio2017EnterpriseCommon7IDECommonExtensionsMicrosoftVSIDisableOutOfProcBuild to easily configure your Visual Studio 2017 environment.